CELL-BASED SENSOR CHIP FOR NEUROTOXICITY MEASUREMENTS IN DRINKING WATER

Dennis Flachs, Manuel Ciba

Abstract


Our drinking water contains residues of pharmaceuticals. A sub-group of these contaminants are neuro-active substances, the antiepileptic carbamazepine being one of the most relevant. For assessment of the neurotoxicity of this drug at a sub-therapeutic level, a cell-based sensor chip platform has been realized and characterized. For this purpose, a microelectrode array chip was designed and processed in a clean room and optimized in terms of low processing costs and good recording properties. For characterization of the system neuronal cells were plated on microelectrode array chips and electrical activity was measured as a function of applied carbamazepine concentration. We found that the relative spike rate decreased with increasing drug concentration resulted in IC50 values of around 36 μM. This value is five orders of magnitude higher than the maximal dose found in drinking water. IC50 values for burst rate, burst duration and synchrony were slightly higher, suggesting spike rate being a more sensitive parameter to carbamazepine.


Keywords


microelectrode array; carbamazepine; neurotoxicity; cell-based biosensor

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

ISSN 0301-5491 (Print)
ISSN 2336-5552 (Online)
Published by the Czech Society for Biomedical Engineering and Medical Informatics and the Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague.